Interim Ministry

First Unitarian Society of Madison is finishing the first year of a three-year interim ministry. The interim ministry period includes the transition ministry work and the settled minister search (beginning in 2020). Below you’ll find information about the transition ministry work. This page will be updated regularly.

Meet the Interim Ministry Transition Team

Lorna Aaronson

Dawn Regenbogen

Alan Knox

Amy Kell

Carol Roan

Lori Neumann

Interim Ministry Transition Team: Overview of Our Conversations with FUS Congregants

One of the roles of the Ministerial Transition Team is to be the “eyes and ears” of the interim minister, reaching out to the congregation to provide accurate information, listen to their voices, their ideas, their hopes, their questions and their concerns about the transition. The information we receive is shared among members of the team and with Doug as we receive it. We want to let you know what we’re hearing, and to give some information on “next steps” for each of the areas we outline below.

What is the job of the Transition Team? It is to solicit, understand and communicate the views of the congregation to Doug about the transition. The Transition Task Force is not involved in the search for the new minister. That will be done by the Ministerial Search Committee, which will form in 2020.

People are passionate about their views and are concerned they are not being sufficiently involved in decision making. We hear that we need more involvement, need to survey congregants, need to institutionalize ways of communicating. We want to be called to action, congregants say, and we do not want decisions made for us.

Between now and June, there will be opportunities for members of the congregation to voice their views and listen to each other. This will include forums, a large leadership congregational forum meeting in April, Board listening sessions, and continued opportunity to meet with members of the Transition Team individually and in small groups. In addition, we will offer periodic updates through the Red Floors, in print version around the building, and in monthly newsletter articles in The Madison Unitarian.

We have heard voices both in support of the extension, and questioning both the value and the process that led to the extension. Why was the decision made to extend the interim period to three years? We need to remember that one of our UU principles relates to the democratic process. As one commenter noted: “The added time does not guarantee a superior outcome.”

More and more congregations are finding that a three-year interim significantly improves the results of their search, and that the three-year process leaves them better prepared to begin that shared ministry well. The idea of a 3-year interim was confirmed at a training for ministers of congregations in transition that Kelly Crocker attended in August 2018. At that time, she learned that while a 2-year interim period is more common, larger congregations, especially those with long and successful ministries, have increasingly turned to a 3-year interim. The candidates most suited to our congregation will want to know that the congregation has undergone a period of deep discernment to both reflect on their past and look to their future. In his report to the Board in January 2019, Doug outlined a number of tasks that would need to be completed before we are ready to go actively into search. Believing that it is better to take the time needed, the Board made the decision to extend the interim period by a year.

Click here to read a letter from the Board of Trustees regarding the third year interim extension.

Going forward, do we want the current structure (Senior Minister, Minister of Congregational Life, Student Minister) or shared ministry? Shouldn’t the congregants decide which model is better? We value a team approach to ministry, but we also are concerned that shared ministry might impinge on our ability to recruit a strong and engaging senior minister.

The denomination has been, and continues to be, challenged to have a broader, more inclusive view of ministry. While our congregation may in the end seek a senior minister or some model of shared ministry, it is important to take time now to address the array of choices. What has worked in shared ministry? Where have such models not worked? What are the workable examples of a senior minister with a collaborative approach to co-ministry? Kelly and Doug will be talking with colleagues in other congregations to gather and share that information and the board will likely appoint a task force to further explore the issue and share the findings with the congregation.

We want to retain the intellectual stimulation, the theological depth and historical grounding for which we are known, but we also want to develop further our spiritual and emotional lives and connection to others.

In our conversations we’ve heard in equal measure from those who seek intellectually challenging sermons during the interim, as well as those who say that they are deeply moved and nurtured by sermons that address their emotional and spiritual longings and help them explore the meaning of this time of transition for themselves and the congregation.

It is important that we maintain and expand external connections between FUS and the larger Madison community including the wide array of non-profit agencies focused on social, economic and environmental justice, music and the arts, the University and other Madison faith-based communities to address the societal concerns of our city.

The decision to go through a 3-year interim allows us to devote time and energy in the fall to exploring our connections with the broader community. The specifics have yet to be spelled out, but typically Doug works with the Transition Team and members of the congregation to reach out to community organizations to help us articulate how we can build on our commitment to being an effective force in our community.

Doug has talked in sermons, the newsletter, and at the parish meeting about what he sees as the needs and goals of the congregation.  Where does he get his information?

When a minister leaves a congregation, the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) does an exit interview with the clergy team and leadership.  Those interviews are made available to potential interim ministers.  In addition, one of the first tasks that Doug gave to the Transition Team was to identify individuals across the congregation who would represent the wide range of members of the congregation: various levels of engagement, length of membership, involvement in various programs, etc. Between August and the end of November, Doug met with each staff person and interviewed approximately 90 members of the congregation to better understand how they see their own and the congregation’s perspective on the transition. The information from this process was discussed with the board, the staff and the transition team to confirm that the trends were consistent with these leaders’ perspectives on the congregation. The discernment continues, but this work early in the fall provided a basis for beginning to shape and an understanding of the congregation.

Upcoming Interim Ministry Town Hall Meetings

Interim Ministry Update
Saturday, April 13, 1 pm – 3 pm
Landmark Auditorium
Living Heritage
Saturday, May 18, 1 pm – 3 pm
Landmark Auditorium